How to File a Non-Owners SR22 Insurance Policy?

Nobody wants to carry an SR-22 form always. But, if the authorities consider someone to be a high-risk driver, they may have to carry an SR-22 certification. A high-risk driver could have received many tickets, had DUI charges or might’ve been involved in multiple accidents.

SR-22 policies are not exactly termed as insurance. They are a proof of the insurance forms that your insurance company submits to the Department of Motor Vehicles of a state. These forms inform the DMV that the specified driver has insurance coverage.

States often mandate drivers to carry SR-22 certifications for several years. These drivers should also maintain a car insurance coverage during this entire period of time.

Unfortunately, not all insurance companies provide SR-22 policies. A driver may have to change insurers after obtaining an SR-22. Drivers also often see an increase in rates after the SR-22 is written.

But what about people who are not the main holder of a car policy? Many people who don’t own vehicles or policies of their own, still drive. And they might have SR-22 requirements too.

How can these drivers get assurance of coverage under such circumstances? A common route is through a non-owner SR-22 policy.

 

Who Are Non-Owners?

The owner of a vehicle is the person who owns the title of the car. The owner is also usually the owner of the insurance policy.

Non-owners are people who are not the titleholders of the vehicle they drive. These are often people like your spouse or your children. Usually, add these drivers to your existing auto insurance policy as secondary controllers.

If one of these non-owners obtains an SR-22 requirement, you could lose the coverage of your policy. They may have to obtain separate insurance coverage to protect their financial responsibilities.

 

What Is a Non-Owner Insurance Policy?

If you thought you need not have insurance if you don’t own a car, think again. 

A non-owners SR22 insurance policy provides coverage when you drive someone else’s car. In this way you can meet the SR22 financial responsibilities, without having to buy a car.

Most non-owner policies only offer liability coverage for personal injury and asset damage. There is zero coverage for the vehicle you are driving, in case of an accident.

Non-owner policies don’t provide personal injury protection (PIP) coverage. Few companies offer medical payment coverage as an option.

Here is an example of how insurance works for non-owners.

You borrow your neighbor’s car and cause an accident. Your neighbor’s car insurance is the first to pay for property damage and injuries. If your neighbor’s policy does not have enough coverage, your non-owner policy is activated.

Your neighbor’s car insurance pays for damages to his car, minus the deductible, since your non-owner policy is solely your responsibility.

One thing to remember, when borrowing someone’s car, is to make sure they have complete collision coverage. If they do not and you cause damage to that car, there is no insurance coverage to repair it. The owner could hold you responsible for the cost of repairs.

Another thing to keep in mind is that non-owner insurance does not cover vehicles that are owned by others in your home.

For instance, let’s say you live with your parents and borrow one of their cars while you save up to buy your own. Since a non-owner policy doesn’t cover yourself in their cars, you must be added as a driver in their policy.

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